A birds eye view of the Prestwold Hall estate

The Estate

Prestwold Farms and Sustainable Farming

Edward & Lisa Packe-Drury-Lowe are responsible for the management of over 1,000 hectares of farmland, parkland and an airfield. The main crops grown at Prestwold are wheat, oil seed rape, barley & peas. Through sustainable agricultural practices Edward aims to protect the local flora and fauna.

Renewable Energy

Much in the tradition of the Victorian stately home, modern technology still plays a part in the running of the house today. Electricity for the house is provided by two rows of photovoltaic panels in the walled garden, producing 50kW of power.

The heating for the house is supplied by a biomass boiler which provides hot water with a series of flow and return pipes to the house. This means the house is lit and heated efficiently and predominantly from renewable energy sources. 

The photovoltaic cells positioned on 150 acres of land at Wymeswold Airfield form one of the largest solar farms in Europe and upon its completion Wymeswold Solar Farm was the largest in the United Kingdom. The panels were connected to the Grid in 2013 and the 130,000 panels produce enough energy to power around 9,000 homes. The cells are expected to produce emission-free energy for the next 25 years.

The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall
The Estate of Prestwold Hall

Contact us now for more details or to arrange a viewing.

Call us on 01509 438138 or email enquiries@prestwold-hall.com

The Cowsheds

Sir Edward Hussey Packe (1878–1946) built the cowsheds as a model farm yard and statement of good farming practices. Built shortly before the turn of the century, they fell into disrepair as mechanization, farming techniques changed. Scrupulously restored in 2011 they have been returned to their former splendor.

The airfield and motor circuit

Wymeswold Airfield has one of the longest runways in the county, second only to East Midlands International Airport. The airfield was used during The Second World War for training bomber pilots. Wellington bombers, which were operated from the airfield, are very large planes without a great deal of propulsion, hence the requirement for 2000 yards of tarmac. 

Today the airfield’s primary use is for motor sports on the purpose-built motor circuit that snakes around the airfield (Everyman Racing), HGV Training (Hughes Driver training) and many sporting activities including running and cycling. The large expanse of grass is ideal for many varied events as well as a large area of tarmac for all weather parking.